Anonymous Asked:
if i get admitted into a hospital psycward.. what will happen in there.... help please

imthegirlthat:

Here’s what happened from my experience. 

First you’ll have an initial assessment. This is just kind of where they figure out what sort of treatment you need (ie. medications, potential diagnoses), and start building your treatment team (your psychiatrist, social worker, nurses, and therapists). They’ll ask a lot of questions and have you fill out some papers. The best thing you can do during your assessment is to be completely honest with them about what’s going on.

Upon intake, they’ll probably have you strip down and put on a hospital gown for a few minutes while they check through your pockets for sharp materials or anything deemed dangerous. At the psychiatric facilities I have been in, I was not allowed hard-soled shoes, things with laces or drawstrings, bras with underwire, and et cetera. They will also check through the bag that you bring/have brought to you (if you do have one brought to you) that could have other clothing and toiletries. If you don’t have one brought to you, they’ll supply what you need to you. I asked my mother to bring me a quilt off of my bed, a pair of jeans, some yoga pants, and a couple of T-shirts. My facility did not allow razors (for obvious reasons) or battery-powered anything, so be certain you check about those rules. If they confiscate something, it will be put in a box with your name on it in a locked room and returned to you at the end of your stay. Other things that most facilities limit your access to may include electronics, pens/pencils, wire-bound books/notebooks, and/or anything that could potentially be used to harm yourself or someone else.

During the duration of your stay, you’ll probably spend most of your time in group therapy sessions, where everyone on your floor or in your unit gets together and talks. There are usually different kinds of therapy. Some are just talking about your goals for recovery and talking about struggles your having. Some will have you fill out worksheets and do some activities. Most treatment centers will have some sort of art or creative therapy session (which was always my favorite).

If it’s during the school year, some treatment centers will take an hour out of the weekdays for you to work on whatever schoolwork your school faxed over for you so that you don’t fall too far behind. If you do fall behind, just communicate with your teachers and your guidance or academic counselor to figure out what you can do to get back on track as quickly (and as sanely) as possible. They’ll work with you, so don’t stress about it.

Throughout your stay, you’ll have visits with your psychiatrist every few days, which will be a one-on-one meeting to discuss how you’re feeling and medication options. Be sure you tell them exactly what’s going on, especially if it’s negative, as some people have very negative reactions to medications, and if it’s your first experience with the mental health care system, the chances of you getting misdiagnosed your first time around are higher. An example of that would be that I was first diagnosed with major depression and put on Prozac, however I actually have bipolar disorder, so the Prozac made the bipolar worse and I had to be switched to a mood stabilizer.

There will be downtime. Some places will have movie nights within your unit or will let you listen to music or draw during rec time. Other places encourage more R&R time. 

Don’t expect to have much privacy in an inpatient psychiatric facility. You will be checked up on a lot (the places I’ve been to came around and did a head count every fifteen to twenty minutes), and you will probably have someone standing right outside the bathroom when you shower. It’s annoying sometimes, but you do get used to it after a couple of days.

I’m proud of you for considering treatment, love. Take care, and let me know if you have any other questions.

Hearts and kibble,
Elliot

Help The Body Positive Movement - Tell Your Story For an Exhibition!

positivebodyimageinspiration:

I received this lovely message from obyt
Please, get involved! I will be!
***
Now, I’m going to have an exhibition here in Germany in the next autumn about wanting to be perfect and the way out of the resulting self-destruction. I have some ideas but what I want are real stories, photos,…

"Note to self: you are so much more than your tragic backstory."

(186/365) by (DS)

humansofnewyork:

"If it wasn’t for this job, I’d still be on heroin. A few years ago, one of my bosses came to me, and he said: ‘You’re approaching a crossroads in life, and pretty soon there will be no turning back.’ Then he told me: ‘Go to rehab right now. And your job waiting for you when you get back.’""What was the boss’s name?""Robert DelPrete."

humansofnewyork:

"If it wasn’t for this job, I’d still be on heroin. A few years ago, one of my bosses came to me, and he said: ‘You’re approaching a crossroads in life, and pretty soon there will be no turning back.’ Then he told me: ‘Go to rehab right now. And your job waiting for you when you get back.’"
"What was the boss’s name?"
"Robert DelPrete."

"I’ve found that growing up means being honest. About what I want. What I need. What I feel. Who I am."

Epiphany (via ridingsidesaddle)

twloha:

YouTuber Rebecca Brown’s time lapse video shows part of her story living with an impulse control disorder.  

(via Buzzfeed

"My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive; and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor, and some style."

Maya Angelou (via onlinecounsellingcollege)

Remember, we can’t avoid triggers forever. Learning to cope with them is a key part of recovery.

(Source: recoveryisbeautiful, via recoveryisbeautiful)

recoveryisbeautiful:

Even though some of the links go directly to the iTunes or Android store, still double check them because most of them are available of both platforms as well as others :)
12 Steps AA Companion (iTunes/Android)
Alura: Cognitive Therapy
ASK & Prevent Suicide (iTunes/Android)
AutisMate
Beating the Blues
Beat Panic
Beat Social Phobia (iTunes/Android)
BellyBio Interactive Breathing
Bipol-App
BioZen
Body Beautiful
BrainHQ
CBT Referee
Circle of 6
Cogmed
CogniFit
Cognitive Diary CBT Self-Help
Cognitive Enhancement Therapy
Constant Therapy
COGPACK
Control Alcohol (iTunes/Android)
DBT Diary Card and Skills Coach
DBT Self Help
Depression CBT Self-Help Guide
Eating D
eCBT
eMoods Bipolar Mood Tracker
Emotions and Feelings - AutismFeelings Book
Fit Brains
Focus Trainer
Guardly
Happy Habits: Choose Happiness
HAPPYneuron
HELP Prevent Suicide (iTunes/Android)
iCBT
iCounselor
iMoodJournal
ImQuit – Quit Addiction
iPromises
iStress
Just-in-Case
Kissy Project
Life Mood
LifeLine Response
Live Happy
Lumosity
Mobicip Safe Browser with Parental Control
Mood and Anxiety Diary
Mood Panda
Mood Tracker
Mood Tracking Journal and Diary
Mood Watch
MoodGYM
MoodKit
Moodlytics
MoodMaster Anti-Depression App
Moody Me
MyBrainSolutions
MindShift
My Mood Tracker
MyThoughts
OneHealth Meeting Finder
OnWatch (iTunes/Android)
Operation Reach Out (iTunes/Android)
Optimism
Overcoming Social Anxiety
Panic Aid
Project Toe
PSSCogRehab
PTSD Coach
QPR Suicide Crisis Support
Recovery Box
Recovery Record
Rise Up + Recover
Sad Scale
SAFE Alternatives
Safe Helpline
Safety App
Safety Plan
SAM – Self Help for Anxiety Management
SAS – Social Anxiety Support
Scientific Brain Training Pro
Self-Esteem Blackboard
Self Help Classics
Sobriety Counter
Stop Panic & Anxiety Self Help
Stop Drinking (iTunes/Android)
STOP!T
StopSelfHarm
Suicide Lifeguard
T2 Mood Tracker
Take Control
Teen Hotlines
The Now
This Way Up
Thought Diary
Watch Over Me – Personal Safety App
Way of Life
WhatsMyM3
Wingman Project
Worry Box- Anxiety Self Help

recoveryisbeautiful:

Even though some of the links go directly to the iTunes or Android store, still double check them because most of them are available of both platforms as well as others :)

(via recoveryisbeautiful)